Do racial differences play a role?


#1

I wonder if situations would be different under different circumstances. Let’s say the victim was white, would there be more done about it? Or let’s say the victim is native? Would there be differences. I wouldnt mind hearing people’s thoughts about this situation.
Personally, I think that many people misinterprate situations of this sort and automatically assume that racism is involved. When in fact natives seem to be more quiet natured people that often keep to themselves and do not make a big fuss about things publicly.
What do you think?


#2

[quote=“No one important”]natives seem to be more quiet natured people that often keep to themselves and do not make a big fuss about things publicly.
[/quote]

Isn’t that a generalization? Wouldn’t that be stereotyping someone. It is just the same as saying First Nations people are natural slobs. (I’m not actually saying that)

It reminds me of a Family Guy episode. Where Peter tries to get his son to take part in a bar mitzvah just so he would be good at math.


#3

It could be stereotyping someone.
But from my own personal views on my very own family, yes we are quiet and keep to ourselves publicly. We look after our own problems and try not to involve too many people. We also have different ways of dealing with issues.
And to compare my statement about quietness and for you to compare it to sloppiness is way out of wack! These two subjects have no relation.
Also, when it came to a particular stereotype, I am sure you could have been slightly more respectful, that was a very low blow! And you must have an underlying issue.
You replied by not even answering what was asked originally!! ?? Did you jump at the chance to add your little measly comment of First Nation people being slobs? Pretty pathetic!


#4

This is a very sensitive subject. I am not sure that I want to add my two cents to this, as it may upset people or cause an argument.
But I must say that I am part First Nations and have recently brought up this subject to my family. We all agreed that yes, we are quiet. Many of us do not like to be in the spotlight and prefer to handle things on our own, and which may very well be in a traditional manner as well. ( We also disagreed when it came to the subject of being slobs :unamused: ) And was wondering why the person who wrote such a thing found it to be appropriate?


#5

Actually it was me who said “Isn’t that a generalization? Wouldn’t that be stereotyping someone. It is just the same as saying First Nations people are natural slobs. (I’m not actually saying that)” I just forgot to log in.

You can trust in the fact that I would be the last person on earth to say anything derogatory about any race or culture. I was simply pointing out that your generalization was the same.

“But from my own personal views on my very own family,â€


#6

I drive a “Res Rocket”.


#7

I agree that there are many false statements created by a lack of knowledge or awareness, and it is important to educate people about stereotypes and their negative effects.
But why is it that many times when a native has been victimized, the story soon disappears and everyone forgets about it quite quickly. But if a girl from a wealthy home goes missing ( like that case in Ontario for example ) the whole country gets involved? Is this just coincidence? Is it because of the class of society a person belongs to? I am asking this because I do not know what to think, nothing else.


#8

Here is another angle that I want to bring to this discussion:

Could the media be more silent when a tragedy like this happens to a non-white person because doing otherwise could add to the stereotypes?

For example: A first nation guy is found dead behind the PAC. At first, it sounds like a suspicious death. Lets assume this gets a big coverage all over B.C. About a month later, in the same community, a teenage girl is found dead, another suspicious death. Assume a big coverage again. What are the implications of this? Do these things reinforce certain stereotypes in the mind of British Columbians?

To use a non-first nation example, I would ask people to describe the way they perceive the indo-canadian ( mostly sikhs) community in the lower mainland, noticebly Surrey, if their only contact with it is trough the media coverage. Although I am sure to be wrong on this, my perception of this community, based only on what I have seen in the media, is quite negative. Before you tell me to not only base this on the media, think about how could I do otherwise. I don’t live in Surrey and I don’t know anyone there. The only reason I am sure to be wrong on this is because I know some Indo-Canadians here in PR and I have great respect for these hardworking people. So I am guessing that the community in Surrey must be full of very good citizens too. However, in the media, I only hear negative things from there.

Discuss…


#9

Again this might be an example of people being cautious that people of color are going to assume other people are being racist. It does seem as though the people around minorities have to tip-toe around and walk on eggshells, due to being accused of being racist or discrimative. It’s a no win situation isn’t it?


#10

I agree with you Prudence. It is a no win situation. Like the old line: you’re damned if you do, and damned if you don’t.


#11

[size=12][/size]This is a subject that should be talked about. It’s all comes down to respect. Respect your neighbour, respect the lands and water that feed you. You may have some, but don’t take it all, take what you need…

From a nativer person’s point of view, most things are cool in rupert, just that I DO NOT TRUST THE COPS!!!
I think they arrested my cousin about 4 times when he was walking home from the bar. (and he was’nt that high either)…One time he was right down the street from his home and he got takin in? WTF?

It’s the cops that have the hate in there eyes… :cry:


#12

Now you have really twisted this subject, into something that really does not entirely exist.
Yeah maybe there are some policemen that do not care for natives a whole lot, but you can not label an entire force as being that way. That is not right.
How can we as people jump into other people’s heads and KNOW what people are thinking or know what they believe in. We can’t.


#13

uh huuuuuuu!!!


#14

[quote]Now you have really twisted this subject, into something that really does not entirely exist.
Yeah maybe there are some policemen that do not care for natives a whole lot, but you can not label an entire force as being that way. That is not right.
How can we as people jump into other people’s heads and KNOW what people are thinking or know what they believe in. We can’t.
[/quote]

Ok, I ment some cops…Happy now…

By the way, try my fish soup recipe. It’s a GREAT First Nations SOUP.
Then tell me your opinion. :stuck_out_tongue:


#15

Ok give me some seaweed and Kitimat grease, until then i can’t make the soup :frowning:


#16

You don’t need the seaweed and grease to make KaJunks (yeah I know I spelled it wrong but that’s the way it’s pronounced,) you can just substitute other things for it. It’s not a set list of ingredients, every family passes on their own recipe as time goes on.


#17

Don’t worrie, I know…but you do need GREESE…
And for some bread lovers, try fried bread to top off the awsome soup.


#18

It just isn’t the same without the real ingredients.


#19

What do you mean it’s not the same without the right ingredients. What I posted was the only ingredients…

If you don’t like it, try some of that shit the Americans are eating on Fear Factory. :smiling_imp:


#20

I was replying to smartass’s previous post. She tried saying you can make the soup without the seaweed and grease!! :unamused: