Coming for a visit!


#1

Hey Peoples!
the date for my visit to Rupert is slated for this weekend, i will be departing from here
on Friday and intend on doing much sight seeing. as i have mentioned before i am particularly interested in seeing your marine life if i can.
does anyone know what season is the best for zoo-planktons? cause if so id like to make another trip eventually. i would like to see if anyone can answer some of my questions here. I understand that you don’t really have any beaches to speak of right?
do you have beaches?, what about tide pool locations? is there anywhere on the island thats available to the public? if i absolutely must i will simply walk under a worf and look, but i simply MUST see what your Marine inverts population is like.
also, is it true that you have cold water varieties of gorgonia and other corals living in the region?


#2

huh?


#3

All of the water front is open to the public.
We have beaches, they just aren’t beachy beaches. More like rock.
I hope you have transportation, so you can find all the little places to go, ridley island is awesome for teensy tidal pools. They aren’t huge though. just water that gets caught on the rocks.


#4

all i needed to know.
sorry about the confusion. i had heard before that allot of the water front wasent available to the public as it was owned by ridely teriminals etc… i gusse its false.
good to know though.
Teensy?


#5

Don’t forget to go walk on the Rushbrook floats. Lots of sessile invertebrate fauna live on the pilings.  Time your visit with the low tide so you can see more stuff.
  (Tide link:
http://www.waterlevels.gc.ca/cgi-bin/tide-shc.cgi?queryType=showFrameset&zone=18&language=english&region=1&stnnum=9354

Ridley island has lots of tide pools usually hidden under brown algae.  Park before the gate and check the rocks in that area.  Then, if the gate is open, walk until you reach the first spot where you see the rocky beach again.  Go down there and explore.
Don’t forget to make an inukshuk!


#6

Haha like those white things. They look like trees, then when you poke them, they squish themselves inside of their little tube. So cool.

I have no idea what they’re called though.


#7

I think you saw an anemone:-)

http://www.valdosta.edu/~jlgoble/Sea%20Anemone%20Diadumene%20Dia%2030cm%201.JPG


#8

Yup, just like that.

There’s lots of things to look at here. I don’t think you’ll have any troubles.


#9

What the hell are those jelly-things that look like abortions?
Do they have a name, or does the Hospital have no incinerator?


#10

I always thought they were jellyfish.

Dunno though.


#11

A friend tells me:

[quote]The WWF has a touch tank this Sunday where he can see all
sorts of invertebrates. They are collecting Friday, Saturday and Sunday.  You
can get in touch with Jennifer at —   Jennifer Rice JDRice@wwfcanada.org
With a name like cnidocyte you should have no trouble finding inverts.[/quote]

So it’s this Sunday at Masonic Hall, and Jennifer is looking for volunteers.  Good opportunity for you cnidocyte!


#12

Lots of shore access off Butze Rapids trail or Kloya Bay. Rent a Kayak and go for a paddle where ever you want. Skeena Kayaking has great rates and can get you set up.


#13

There is a 20 year PRSS grad reunion this weekend and the touch tank at the Masonic Hall event is part of their “Family Day”.


#14